Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)
 

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-2011

Journal

British Journal of Sociology of Education

Volume

32

Issue

2

First Page

203

Last Page

220

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01425692.2011.547306

Abstract

The perspectives of indigenous science learners in developed nations offer an important but frequently overlooked dimension to debates about the nature of science, the science curriculum, and calls from educators to make school science more culturally responsive or ‘relevant’ to students from indigenous or minority groups. In this paper the findings of a study conducted with indigenous Maori children between the ages of 10 and 12 years are discussed. The purpose of the study was to examine the ways that indigenous children in an urban school environment in New Zealand position themselves in relation to school science. Drawing on the work of Basil Bernstein, we argue that although the interplay between emergent cultural identity narratives and the formation of ‘science selves’ is not as yet fully understood, it carries the potential to open a rich seam of learning for indigenous children.


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